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captal: `Sir, let us go quickly after them see you not how they do flyaway?' ` Ah,' said the captal, ` trust not thereto : they do it but for an evil intent and to beguile us.' Then sir John Jouel avanced himself, for he had great desire to fight with his enemies, saying to his company, `Saint George ! whosoever loveth me let them follow, for I will go and fight with our enemies': and so took his spear in his hand and went forth before all the battles and descended down the hill, and some of his company, or the captal knew thereof. But when he saw that sir John Jouel was gone to fight without him, he took it of great presumption and said to them about him : `Sirs, let us go down the hill quickly, for sir John Jouel shall not fight without me.' Then the captal and his company advanced them down the hill, and when the Frenchmen saw them descend from the hill and come into the plain fields, they were right joyous, and said, ` Lo, now we may see that we have desired all this day' ; and so suddenly turned and cried `Our Lady, Guesclin ! 'and dressed their banners against the Navarrois, and so assembled together all afoot ; and sir John Jouel, who courageously assembled his banners against the battle ofthe Bretons, of whom sir Bertram was chief captain, did many a feat of arms, for he was a hardy knight. Thus the knights and squires sparkled abroad in the plain and fought together with such weapons as they had, and each of them entered into other's battle and so fought with great courage and will; the Englishmen and Navarrois cried `Saint George !' and the Frenchmen `Our Lady, Guesclin ! ' There were many good knights on the French part, as sir Bertram of Guesclin, the young earl of Auxerre, the viscount Beaumont, sir Baudwyn d'Annequin, sir Louis of Chalon, the young lord of Beaujeu, sir Antony, who that day reared his banner, sir Louis of Haveskerke, sir Oudart of Renty, sir Enguerrand of Eudin ; and also of Gascons, first sir Aymenion of Pommiers, sir Perducas d'Albret, sir soudic de Latrau, sir Petiton of Curton, and divers other of that sort : and the Gascons dressed them against the captal and his company, and they against them ; they had great desire to meet each other : there was a sore battle and many a noble feat of arms done and. achieved. A man ought not to lie willingly : 1 it might be demanded where was the archpriest all this season, who was a great captain and had a great company under his rule, because I make no mention of him. I shall shew you the truth. As soon as the archpriest saw the battle begin, he gat himself out of the press, but he said to his company and to him that bare his standard : ` I charge you all, as ye love me or fear my displeasure, that ye abide the end of the battle and do your devoirs as well as ye can ; but as for me, I will depart and not return again, for I may not as this day fight nor be armed against some knight that is in the field against us. And if any demand for me, answer them as I have shewed you before.' So thus he departed, and but one squire all only with him, and so he repassed the river and let the remnant deal; and so the residue of the field missed him not, for they saw his banner and company to the end of the battle, wherefore they believed surely that he had been there personally. Now shall I shew you of the battle and how it was ended. At the beginning of the battle, when sir John Jouel was come down the hill and his company with him, and the captal also and his company, trusting to have had the victory (howbeit the case turned otherwise), and saw that the Frenchmen turned fhem in good array and order, then they perceived well how they had been too hasty to come from their advantage. Howbeit, like valiant knights, they bashed nothing, but thought to win the victory with their hands in plain field. And so a little they reculed back and assembled together all their people, and then they made way for their archers to come forth on before, who as then were behind them. And when the archers were forward, then they shot fiercely together, but the Frenchmen were so well



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