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number of sixteen thousand fighting men, and now ye hear all contrary.' `Sir,' quoth he, `I thought them never under the said sum, and if they be not, God be thanked ; it is the better for us. Therefore now take heed what ye will do.' ` In the name of God,' quoth the lord of Bourbon, 'we will go and fight with them' : and there he ordered his battles and set them in good array ready to fight, for he might see his enemies before him ; and there he made certain new knights, first his own eldest son Peter, and he raised his banner, and also his nephew the young earl of Forez, the lord of Tournon, the lord of Montelimar and the lord Groslee of Dauphine ; and there were also the lord Louis [and] sir Robert of Beaujeu, sir Louis of Chalon, sir Hugh of Vienne, the earl d'Uzes and divers other good knights and squires, all desiring to advance their honours and to overthrow these companions that thus pilled the country without any title of reason: and there it was ordained that the archpriest, sir Arnold of Cervolles, should govern the first battle, for he was a good and expert knight, and he had in that battle sixteen hundred fighting men. These routs of companions that were on the mountain saw right well the ordering of the Frenchmen, but they could not so well see them nor their guiding, nor approach well to them but to their great danger or damage; for these companions had in this mountain a thousand cartload of great stones, which was greatly to their advantage and profit. These Frenchmen that so sore desired to fight with their enemies, howsoever they did, they could not come to them the next way ; therefore they were driven of necessity to coast about the mountain, where their enemies were: and when they came on that side, then they, who had great provision of stones, began to cast so sore down the hill on them that did approach, that they beat down, hurt and maimed a great number, in such wise that they might nor durst not pass nor approach any nearer to them : and so that first battle was so sore beaten and defoiled, that of all day after they did but little aid. Then to their succour approached the other battles with sir James of Bourbon, his son and his nephews, with their banners and a great number of good men of war, and all went to be lost; the which was great damage and pity, that they had not wrought by better advice and counsel than they did. The archpriest and divers other knights that were there had said before that it had been best to have suffered their enemies to have dislodged out of the hold that they were in, and then to have fought with them at more ease ; but they could not be heard. Thus, as the lord James of Bourbon and the other lords with their banners and pennons before them approached and coasted the said mountain, the worst armed of the companions cast still continually stones at them in such wise that the hardiest of them was driven aback; and thus, as they held them in that estate a great space, the great fresh battle of these companions found a way and came about the mountain well ranged and bad cut their spears of six foot of length, and so came crying with one voice and brake in among the Frenchmen. So at the first meeting they overthrew many to the earth: there were sore strokes on both parts, and these companions fought so ardently that it was marvel, and caused the Frenchmen to recule back : and there the archpriest like a good knight fought valiantly, but he was taken prisoner by force of arms and sore hurt, and divers other knights and squires of his company. Whereto should I make longer rehearsal of this matter? In effect the Frenchmen had the worse ; and the lord James of Bourbon was sore hurt, and sir Peter his son, and there was slain the young earl of Forez, and taken sir Raynold of Forez his uncle, the earl d'Uzes, sir Robert of Beaujeu, sir Louis of Chalon, and more than a hundred knights, and with much pain the lord of Bourbon and his son Peter were borne into the city of Lyons. This battle was about the year of our Lord God a thousand three hundred threescore and one, the Frid



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