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Certain knights and squires that were well horsed passed through the archers and thought to approach to the prince, but they could not. The lord James Audley with his four squires was in the front of that battle and there did marvels in arms, and by great prowess he came and fought with sir Arnold d'Audrehem under his own banner, and there they fought long together and sir Arnold was there sore handled. The battle of the marshals began to disorder by reason of the shot of the archers with the aid of the men of arms, who came in among them and slew of them and did what they list, and there was the lord Arnold d'Audrehem taken prisoner by other men than by sir James Audley or by his four squires ; for that day he never took prisoner, but always fought and went on his enemies. Also on the French party the lord John Clermont fought under his own banner as long as he could endure : but there he was beaten down and could not be relieved nor ransomed, but was slain without mercy some said it was because of the words that he had the day before to sir John Chandos. So within a short space the marshals' battles were discomfited, for they fell one upon another and could not go forth ;' and the Frenchmen that were behind and could not get forward reculed back and came on the battle of the duke of Normandy, the which was great and thick and were afoot, but anon they began to open behind'; 2 for when they knew that the marshals battle was discomfited, they took their horses and departed, he that might best. Also they saw a rout of Englishmen coming down a little mountain a-horseback, and many archers with them, who brake in on the side of the duke's battle. True to say, the archers did their company that day great advantage ; for they shot so thick that the Frenchmen wist not on what side to take heed, and little and little the Englishmen won ground on them. And when the men of arms of England saw that the marshals' battle was discomfited and that the duke's battle began to disorder and open, they leapt then oil their horses, the which they had ready by them: then they assembled together

1 `Ne pooient aler avant.'

2 ` Which was great and thick in front (pardevant), but anon it became open and thin behind.'

and cried, 'Saint George! Guyenne !' and the lord Chandos said to the prince ` Sir, take your horse and ride forth ; this journey is yours: God is this day in your hands : get us to the French king's battle, for their lieth all the sore of the matter. I think verily by his valiantness he will not fly : I trust we shall have him by the grace of God and Saint George, so he be well fought withal: and, sir, I heard you say that this day I should see you a good knight.' The prince said, `Let us go forth ; ye shall not see me this day return back,' and said, 'Advance, banner, in the name of God and of Saint George.' The knight that bare it did his commandment : there was then a sore battle and a perilous, and many a man overthrown, and he that was once down could not be relieved again without great succour and aid. As the prince rode and entered in among his enemies, he saw on his right hand in a little bush lying dead the lord Robert of Duras and his banner by him,' and a ten or twelve of his men about him. Then the prince said to two of his squires and to three archers : ` Sirs, take the body of this knight on a targe and bear him to Poitiers, and present him from me to the cardinal of Perigord, and say how I salute him by that token.' And this was done. The prince was informed that the cardinal's men were on the field against him, the which was not pertaining to the right order of arms, for men of the church that cometh and goeth for treaty of peace ought not by reason to bear harness nor to fight for neither of the parties.; they ought to be indifferent : and because these men had done so, the prince was displeased with the cardinal, and therefore he sent unto him his nephew the lord Robert of Duras dead : and the chatelain of Amposte was taken, and the prince would have had his head stricken off, because he was pertainin



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