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Page 107 (Chronicles of Froissart)



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of Guines, and into Ternois, and to the gates of Saint-Omer's, and sometime to Boulogne ; they brought into their host great preys. The king would not assail the town of Calais, for he thought it but a lost labour : he spared his people and his artillery, and said how he would famish them in the town with long siege, without the French king come and raise his siege perforce. When the captain of Calais saw the manner and the order of the Englishmen, then he constrained all poor and mean people to issue out of the town, and on a Wednesday there issued out of men, women and children more than seventeen hundred; and as they passed through the host, they were demanded why they departed, and they answered and said, because they had nothing to live on : then the king did them that grace that he suffered them to pass through his host without danger, and gave them meat and drink to dinner, and every person two pence sterling in alms, for the which divers many of them prayed for the king's prosperity.

CHAPTER CXXXIV

How the duke of Normandy brake up his siege before Aiguillon.

SUMMARY.-The French king sent for the duke of Normandy to return and defend France, so the French departed from that siege. As they departed, those within made a sally and took several prisoners, from whom sir Walter Manny heard of the king of England's campaign in France. The king of France was displeased with sir Godemar du Fay, because he had not well kept the passage of Blanche-taque, and he would have lost his life, but sir John of Hainault excused him.

CHAPTER CXXXV

How sir Gaultier of Manny rode through all France by safe-conduct to Calais.

It was not long after, but that sip Gaultier of Manny fell in communication with a knight of Normandy, who was his prisoner, and demanded of him what money he would pay for his ransom. The knight answered and said he would gladly pay three thousand crowns. `Well,' quoth the lord Gaultier, ` I know well ye be kin to the duke of Normandy and well beloved with him, [so] that I am sure, an if I would sore oppress you, I am sure ye would gladly pay ten thousand crowns; but I shall deal otherwise with you. I will trust you on your faith and promise: ye shall go to the duke your lord, and by your means get a safeconduct for me and twenty other of my company to ride through France to Calais, paying courteously for all our expenses. And if ye can get this of the duke or of the king, I shall clearly quit you your ransom with much thank, for I greatly desire to see the king my master ; nor I will lie but one night in a place till I come there. And if ye cannot do this, return again hither within a month, and yield yourself still as my prisoner.' The knight was content and so went to Paris to the duke his lord, and he obtained this passport for sir Gaultier of Manny and twenty horse with him all only. This knight returned to Aiguillon and brought it to sir Gaultier, and there he quitted the knight Norman of his ransom. Then anon after, sir Gaultier took his way and twenty horse with him, and so rode through Auvergne; and when he tarried in any place, he shewed his letter and so was let pass : but when he came to Orleans, for all his letter he was arrested and brought to Paris and there put in prison in the Chatelet. When the duke of Normandy knew thereof, he went to the king his father and shewed him how sir Gaultier of Manny had his safe-conduct, wherefore he required the king as much as he might to deliver him, or else it should be said how he had betrayed him. The king answered and said how he should be put to death, for he reputed him for his great enemy. Then said the duke : ` Sir, if ye do so, surely I shall never bear armour against the king of England, nor all such as I may let.' And at his departing he said that he would never enter again into the king's host. Thus the matter stood a certain time. There was a knight of Hainault called sir Mansart d'Esne : he purchased all that he might to help sir Walter of Manny, and went often in and out to the duke of Nor.




Page 107 (Chronicles of Froissart)