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than they won. When night came on, every man drew to their lodging. The next day the lords took counsel to assail the barriers, to see the manner of them within; and so the third day they made a great assault to the barriers from morning till it was noon. Then the assailants drew aback sore beaten and divers slain. When the lords of France saw their men draw aback, they were sore displeased, and caused the assault to begin again more fiercer than it was before, and they within defended themselves valiantly. The countess herself ware harness on her body and rode on a great courser from street to street, desiring her people to make good defence, and she caused damosels and other women to cut short their kirtles and to carry stones' and pots full of chalk to the walls, to be cast down to their enemies. This lady did there an hardy enterprise. She mounted up to the height of a tower, to see how the Frenchmen were ordered without: she saw how that all the lords and all other people of the host were all gone out of their field to the assault: then she took again her courser, armed as she was, and caused three hundred men a-horseback to be ready, and she went with them to another gate, whereas there was none assault. She issued out and her company, and dashed into the French lodgings, and cut down tents and set fire in their lodgings : she found no defence there, but a certain of varlets and boys, who ran away. When the lords of France looked behind them and saw their lodgings afire and heard the cry and noise there, they returned to the field crying, � Treason ! treason ! ' so that all the assault was left. When the countess saw that, she drew together her company, and when she saw she could not enter again into the town without great damage, she took another way and went to the castle of Brest, the which was not far thence. When sir Louis of Spain, who was marshal of the host, was 1 A curious mistranslation. Froissart says : 'She made the women of the town, ladies and other, take up the pavement of the streets (despecer les chaussees) and carry stones to the battlements to cast upon their enemies.' The translator has confused 'chaussees' and `chausses,' and so got the idea of cutting short the kirtles. In the next clause 'chalk' is his translation of ' chaulx vive,' ' quick. lime.' come to the field, and saw their lodgings brenning and saw the countess and her company going away, he followed after her with a great number. He chased her so near, that he slew and hurt divers of them that were behind, evil horsed, but the countess and the most part of her company rode so well that they came to Brest, and there they were received with great joy. The next. day the lords of France, who had lost their tents and their provisions, then took counsel to lodge in bowers of trees more nearer to the town; and they had great marvel when they knew that the countess herself had done that enterprise. They of the town wist not where the countess was become, whereof they were in great trouble, for it was five days or they heard any tidings. The countess did so much at Brest that she gat together a five hundred spears, and then about midnight she departed from Brest, and by the sunrising she came along by the one side of the host, and came to one of the gates of Hennebont, the which was opened for her, and therein she entered and all her company with great noise of trumpets and canayrs ; whereof the French host had great marvel, and armed them and ran to the town to assault it, and they within ready to defend. There began a fierce assault and endured till noon, but the Frenchmen lost more than they within. At noon the assault ceased then they took counsel that sir Charles de Blois should go from that siege and give assault to the castle of Away, the which king Arthur made, and with him should go the duke of Bourbon, the earl of Blois, the marshal of France sir Robert Bertrand, and that sir Herve de Leon, and part of the Genoways, and the lord Louis of Spain and the viscount of Rohan, with all the Spaniards, should abide still before Hennebont :



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