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CHAPTER LXXIV

How king David of Scotland came with a great host to Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

SUMMARY.-King David was received ,with great joy and gathered a great host. They marched into England, leaving Roxburgh and Berwick aside, and carne to Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Here an attack was made upon them from the town and the earl of Moray was taken prisoner. The Scots assaulted the town to no purpose. Lille in France. This lady comforted them greatly within, `for by the regard of . such a lady and by her sweet comforting a titan ought to be worth two rnen at need.' After the first day it was proposed to send for aid to king Edward, who lay at York, and sir William Montague himself offered to ride thither, and passed through the host of the Scots by night. After several days of fruitless assaults the king of Scots was advised to depart, for fear lest the king of England should come thither, and the Scots retired to the forest of Jedworth.

CHAPTER LXXV

How king David of Scotland destroyed the city of Durham.

SUMMARY.-The Scots left Newcastle and came to Durham, mad at having lost the earl of Moray. Sir John Nevill, captain at Newcastle, rode within five days from thence to Chertsey, where the king lay, and brought a report of the Scots. The king ordered a general levy to defend the realm, and himself hastened northward. Meanwhile the Scots took Durham by assault and destroyed it utterly, with the churches, putting to death men, women and children, and not sparing monks, prelates or canons.

CHAPTER LXXVI

How the Scots besieged a castle of the earl of Salisbury's.

SUMMARY.-King David drew toward Carlisle and passed by a castle of the earl of Salisbury's,' whereof sir William Montague, nephew to the earl of Salisbury, was captain. This sir William Montague attacked the rear-guard of the Scots and carried off some of their plunder, wherefore an assault was made on the castle. There was within the noble countess of Salisbury, who was reputed for the sagest and fairest lady of all England. Her husband, as we have heard, had been taken prisoner before

1 Probably Wark castle, but the whole of this narrative is very unhistorical.

CHAPTER LXXVII

How the king of England was in amours with the countess of Salisbury.

THE same day that the Scots departed from the said castle, king Edward came thither with all his host about noon, and came to the same place whereas the Scots had lodged, and was sore displeased that he found not the Scots there, for he came thither in such haste, that his horse and men were sore travailed. Then he commanded to lodge there that night, and said how he would go see the castle and the noble lady therein, for he had not seen her sith she was married before: then every man took his lodging as he list. And as soon as the king was unarmed, he took a ten or twelve knights with him and went to the castle, to salute the countess of Salisbury and to see the manner of the assaults of the Scots and the defence that was made against them. As soon as the lady knew of the king's coming, she set open the gates and came out so richly beseen, that every man marvelled of her beauty and could not cease to regard her nobleness, with her great beauty and the gracious words and countenance that she made. When she came to the king, she kneeled down to the earth, thanking him of his succours, and so led him into the castle to make him cheer and honour, as she that could right well do it. Every man regarded her marvellously: the king himself could not withhold his regarding of her ; for he thought that he never saw before so noble nor so fair a lady. He was stricken therewith to the heart




Page 72 (Chronicles of Froissart)