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day they met again, and so finally accorded on a truce to endure for a year between all parties and all their men, and also between them that were in Scotland, and all such as made war in Gascoyne, Poitou and in Saintonge ; and this truce to begin the fortieth day next ensuing, and within that space every party to give knowledge to his men without mal-engine ; and if such companies will not keep the peace, let them be at their choice : but as for France, Picardy, Burgoyne, Bretayne and Normandy, to be bound to this peace without any exception and this peace to begin incontinent between the hosts of the two kings. Also it was determined that both parties in each of their names should send four or five personages as their ambassadors and to meet at Arras, and the pope in like wise to send thither four, and there to make a full confirmation without any mean.' Also by this truce every party to enjoy and possess all and everything that they were as then in possession of. This truce incontinent was cried in both hosts, whereof the Brabances were right glad, for they were sore weary with so long lying at the siege : so that the next day, as soon as it was daylight, ye should have seen tents taken down, chariots charged and people remove so thick, that a man would have thought to have seen a new world. Thus the good town of Tournay was safe without any great damage: howbeit they within endured great pain ; their victuals began to fail, for, as it was said, they had as then scant to serve them a three or four days at the most. The Brabances departed quickly, for they had great desire thereto the king of England departed sore against his mind, if he might have done otherwise ; but in manner he was fain to follow the wills of the other lords and to believe their counsels. And the French king could abide no longer thereas he lay, for the evil air and the weather hot : so the Frenchmen had the honour of that journey,2 because they had rescued Tournay and caused their enemies to depart. The king of England and the lords on his party said how they had the honour, by reason that they had

1 ` And that which these parties should ordain, the two kings should hold and confirm without any exception taken.' And so the Frenchmen thought on their part that they had the honour,' ctc. tarried so long within the realm, and besieged one of the good towns thereof, and also had wasted and burnt in the French country, and that the French king had not rescued it in time and hour, as he ought to have done, by giving of battle, and finally agreed to a truce, their enemies being still at the siege and brenning his country. Thus these lords departed from the siege of Tournay, and every man drew to his own. The king of England came to Gaunt to the queen his wife, and shortly after passed the sea, and all his, except such as should be at the parliament at Arras. The earl of Hainault returned to his country and held a noble feast at Mons is Hainault, and a great joust, in the which Gerard of Werchin, seneschal of Hainault, did joust, and was so sore hurt, that he died of the stroke : he had a son called John, who was after a good knight and a hardy, but he was but a while in good health. The French king gave leave to every man to depart, and went himself to Lille, and thither came they of Tournay, and the king received them joyously and did shew them great grace : he gave them freely their franchise, the which they had lost long before, wherewith they were joyous ; for sir Godemar du Fayand divers other knights had been long governours there : then they made new provost and jurates according to their ancient usages. Then the king departed from Lille to go to Paris. Now then came the season that the council should be at Arras: and for pope Clement thither came in legation the cardinal of Naples and the cardinal of Clermont, who came to Paris, whereas the king made them much honour, and so came to Arras : for the French king there was the earl of Alencon, the duke of Bourbon, the earl of Flanders, the earl of Blois, the archbishop of Sens, the bishop of Be



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