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queen at Gaunt: these ladies tho king caused to be well kept with three hundred men of arms and five hundred archers. When the king and his marshals had ordered his battles, he drew up the sails and came with a quarter wind to have the vantage of the sun, and so at last they turned a little to get the wind at will.' And when the Normans saw them recule back, they had marvel why they did so, and some said, `They think themselves not meet to meddle with us, wherefore they will go back.' They saw well how the king of England was there personally, by reason of his banners. Then they did apparel their fleet in order, for they were sage and good men of war on the sea, and did set the Christofe r, the which they had won the year before, to be foremost, with many trumpets and instruments,2 and so set on their enemies. There began a sore battle on both parts: archers and cross-bows began to shoot, and men of arms approached and fought hand to hand : and the better to come together they had great hooks and grappers of iron, to cast out of one ship into another, and so tied them fast together. There were many deeds of arms done, taking and rescuing again, and at last the great Christofer was first won by the Englishmen, and all that were within it taken or slain. Then there was great noise and cry, and the Englishmen approached and fortified the Christofer with archers, and made him to pass on before to fight with the Genoways. This battle was right fierce and terrible ; for the battles on the sea are more dangerous and 1 The original text says: 'They came with the wind on thelr quarter to have the advantage of the sun, which as they came was in their. faces. They bethought them that this might damage them much, and therefore they turned a little out of their course till they had the wind at will.' But tbetrue reading is, 'till they had it (i.e. the sun) at their will.' It must be supposed that they were coming over before a west wind, for which they would probably have waited. On this course they would have the sun directly in their faces at prime, when the battle began ; and perceiving this they avoided the disadvantage by changing their course, so as to have the wind on their right quarter and so come in from the north-west instead of directly from the west. To do this they would have to sail first some little way to the northward, and it was this movement that caused the Normans to think that they were retiring. 2 In the better text the Christofer is said to be filled with cross-bowmen and Genoese, and the ' s and instruments' are mentioned only in g=et as sounded upon the advance of the fleet. fiercer than the battles by land : for on the sea there is no rescuing nor fleeing ; there is no remedy but to fight and to abide fortune, and every man to shew his prowess. Of a truth sir Hugh Quieret, and sir Behuchet and Barbevaire were right good and expert men of war. This battle endured from the morning till it was noon, and the Englishmen endured much pain, for their enemies were fouragainst one, and all good men on the sea. There the king of England was a noble knight of his own hand ; he was in the flower of his yongth : in like wise so was the earl of Derby, Pembroke, Hereford, Huntingdon, Northampton and Gloucester, sir Raynold Cobham, sir Richard Stafford, the lord Percy, sir Walter of Manny, sir Henry of Flanders, sir John Beauchamp, the lord Felton, the lord Bradestan, sir [John] Chandos, the lord Delaware, the lord of Multon, sir Robert d'Artois called earl of Richmond, and (livers other lords and knights, who bare themselves so valiantly with some succours that they had of Bruges and of the country thereabout, that they obtained the victory ; so that the Frenchmen, Normans and other were discomfited, slain and drowned; there was not one that scaped, but all were slain. When this victory was achieved, the king all that night abode in his ship before Sluys, with great noise of trumpets and other instruments. Thither came to see the king divers of Flanders, such as had heard of the king's coming. And then the king demanded



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