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men also robbed the place and brent it to the earth, and with all their pillage they returned to Cambray. These tidings anon came to the knowledge of the earl of Hainault, who was abed and asleep in his lodging, called the Salle; and suddenly he rose and armed him, and called up all such knights as were about him : but they were lodged so abroad that they were not so soon ready as the earl was; who without tarrying for any person came into the market-place of Valenciennes and caused the bells to be sowned alarum. Then every man arose and armed them, and followed the earl their lord, who was ridden out of the town in great haste and took the way toward Haspres : and by that time he had ridden a league, tidings came to him how the Frenchmen were departed. Then he rode to the abbey of Fontenelles, whereas the lady his mother was, and she had much ado to rappease him of his displeasure, for he said plainly that the destruction of Haspres should dearly be revenged in the realm of France. The good lady his mother did as much as she could to assuage his ire, and to excuse the king of that deed. So when the earl had been there a certain space, he took leave of her and returned to Valenciennes, and incontinent wrote letters to the prelates and knights of his country to have their advice and counsel in that behalf. And when sir John of Hainault knew hereof, he took his horse and came to the earl his nephew ; and as soon as the earl saw him, he said, ` Ah, fair uncle, your absence hath set the Frenchmen in a pride.' 'Ah, sir,' quoth he, 'with your trouble and annoyance I am sore displeased : howbeit in a manner I am glad thereof. Now ye be well rewarded for the service and love that ye have borne to the Frenchmen.' Now it behoveth you to make a journey into France against the French men. , Ah, uncle,' quoth the earl, 'look into what quarter ye think best and it shall be shortly done.' So thus the day of parliament assigned at Mons came, and Thierry, who were in the garrison at Bouchain in Ostrevant ; for though that the country of Hainault at that time was in no war, yet all the frontiers toward France were ever in good await. So then they ordained a horse litter right honourably and put his body therein, and caused two friars to convey it to his brethren, who received him with great sorrow. And they bare him to the Friars at Valenciennes, and there he was buried ; and after that the two brethren of Manny came to the castle of Than and made sore war against them of Cambray in counteravenging the death of their brother. In this season captain of Tournay and Tournesis was sir Godemar du Fay, and of the fortresses thereabout; and the lord of Beaujeu was within Mortagne on the river of l'Escault, and the steward of Carcassonne was in the town of Saint-Amand, Sir Aymar of Poitiers in Douay, the lord Galois de la Baume and the lord of Villars, the marshal of Mirepoix and the lord of Moreuil in the city of Cambray. And these knights, squires and soldiers of France desired none other thing, but that theymight enter into Hainault and to rob and pill the country. Also the bishop of Cambray, who was at Paris with the king, complained how the Hainowes had done him damage, brent and overrun his country, more than any other men. And then the king gave licence to the soldiers of Cambresis to make a road into Hainault: Then they of the garrisons made a journey and were to the number of six hundred men of arms. And on a Saturday in the morning they departed from Cambray, and also they of la Malmaison rode forth the same day, and met together and went to the town of Haspres, the which was a good town and a great, without walls. The people there were in no doubt, for they knew of no war towards them. So the Frenchmen entered and found men and women in their houses, and took them, and robbed the town at their pleasure, and then set fire in the town and brent it so clean, that nothing remained but the walls. Within the town there was a priory of black monks, with great buildings beside the church, which held of Saint-Vaast of Arras.1 The French cruel



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