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Gueldres, to the marquis of Juliers, to the lord John of Hainault, and to all such as he trusted to have any comfort of, saying how he would gladly speak with them. They came all to Antwerp between Whitsuntide and the feast of Saint John. And when the king had well feasted them, he desired to know their minds, when they would begin that they had promised, requiring them to despatch the matter briefly. For that intent, he said, he was come thither and had all his men ready, and how it should be a great damage to him to defer the matter long. These lords had long counsel among them, and finally they said, `Sir, our coming hither as now was more to see you than for anything else. We be not as now purveyed to give you a full answer : by your licence we shall return to our people and come again to you at your pleasure, and then give you so plain an answer that the matter shall not rest in us.' Then they took day to come again a three weeks after the feast of Saint John. The king shewed them what charges he was at with so long abiding, thinking when he came thither that they had been full purveyed to have made him a plain answer, saying how that he would not return into England till he had a full answer. So thus these lords departed, and the king tarried in the abbey of Saint Bernard ; and some of the English lords tarried still at Antwerp to keep the king company, and some of the other rode about the country in great dispense. The duke of. Brabant went to Louvain, and there tarried a long time, and oftentimes he sent to the French king, desiring him to have no suspicions to him, and not to believe any evil information made of him; for by his will, he said, he would make none alliance nor covenant against him; saying also that the king of Eng-land was his cousin-german, wherefore he might not denyhim to come into his country. The day came that the king of England looked to have an answer of these lords: and they excused them, and said how they were ready and their men, so that the duke of Brabant would be ready for his part, saying that he was nearer than they, and that as soon as they might know that he were ready, they would not be behind, but at the beginning of the matter as soon as lie. Then the king did so much that he spake again with the duke, and shewed him the answer of the other lords, desiring him by amity and lineage that no fault were found in him, saying how he perceived well that he was but cold in the matter, and that without he were quicker and did otherwise, he doubted he should lose thereby the aid of all the other lords of Almaine through his default. Then the duke said he would take counsel in the matter ; and when he had long debated the matter, he said how he should be as ready as any other, but first he said he would speak again with the other lords: and he did send for them, desiring them to come to him whereas they pleased best. Then the day was appointed about the mid of August, and this council to be at Hal, because of the young earl of Hainault, who should also be there, and with him sir John of Hainault his uncle. When these lords were all come to this parliament at Hal, they had long counsel together. Finally they said to the king of England : `Sir, we see no cause why we should make defiance to the French king, all things considered, without ye can get the agreement of the emperor, and that he would command us to do so in his name. The emperor may well thus do, for of long time past there was a covenant sworn and sealed, that no king of France ought to take anything pertaining to the Empire ; and this king Philip bath taken the castle of Crevecceur in Cambresis and the castle of Arleux in Palluel, and the city of Cambray ;1 wherefore the emperor bath good cause to defy him by us. Therefore, sir, if ye can get his accord, our honour shall be the more.' And the king said he would follow their counsel. Then it was ordained that the marquis of Juliers should go to the emperor, and certain knights and clerks of the king's, and some of the council of the duke of Gueldres ; but the duke of Brabant wo
1 A better reading is, `and divers other heritages . in the said county of Cambresis,' without any mention of the city of Cambray.




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