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the king caused to be skewed the message, and how he had written to the king of Scots, and of the answer of the same king. Wherefore the king desired all the nobles of his realm, that they would give him such counsel as should appertain to the saving of his honour and right. And when they were all assembled in council, they thought that the king might no longer bear by his honour the injuries and wrongs that the king of Scots did him daily: and so they reported their advice to the king, exhorting him to provide for his force and strength of men of war, to attain thereby the town of Berwick, and to enter into the realm of Scotland in such wise, that he should constrain the king of the Scots to be joyful to come and do his homage to him. And so all the nobles and commons of the realm of England said they would gladly and will ingly go with him in that journey. And of their good wills the king thanked them greatly, and desired them to be ready apparelled at a day assigned, and to assemble together at Newcastle-upon-Tyne. And then every man went home and prepared for that journey. Then the king sent again other ambassadors to the king of Scots his brother-inlaw, sufficiently to summon him; and if he would not be otherwise advised, then the king gave them full authority to defy him. And so the day of the assembly of the king's host approached, at the which day the king of England and all his host arrived at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and there tarried three days for the residue of his host that was coming after. And on the fourth day he departed with all his host toward Scotland, and passed through the lands of the lord Percy and of the lord Neville, who were two great lords in Northumberland, and marched on the Scots. And in like wise so did the lord Ros and the lord Lucy and the lord Mowbray. Then the king and all his host drew toward the city of Berwick, for the king of Scotland made no other answer to these second messengers, but as he did to the first ; wherefore he was openly defied and summoned. And so the king of England and his host entered into Scotland ; for he was counselled that he should not tarry at siege at Berwick, but to ride forth and to burn the country, as his grandfather did. And so he did; in which journey he wasted and destroyed all the plain country of Scotland, and exiled divers towns that were closed with dikes and with pales, and took the strong castle of Edinburgh and set therein a garrison and so passed the second river in Scotland, under Stirling, and ran over all the country thereabout to Scone, and destroyed the good town of Dunfermline; but they did no evil to the abbey, for the king of England commanded that no hurt should be done thereto and so the king conquered all the country to Dundee and to Dumbarton, a strong castle standing on the marches against the wild Scots, whereas the king of Scots and the queen his wife were withdrawn unto for surety. For there were no Scots that would appear afore the Englishmen ; for they were all drawn into the forests of Gedworth, the which were inhabitable, and specially for them that knew not the country; wherein all the Scots were, and all their goods, and so they set but a little by all the remnant. And it was no marvel though they were thus driven, for the king their lord was but fifteen year of age, and the earl of Moray was but young,1 and the nephew of William Douglas that was slain in Spain was also of the same age ; so as at that time the realm of Scotland was dispurveyed of good captains. And when the king of England had run over all the plain country of Scotland and tarried there the space of six months, and saw that none would come against him, then he garnished divers castles that he had won, and thought by them to make war to all the other. Then he withdrew fair and easily toward Berwick, and in his returning he won the castle of Dalkeith, pertaining to the heritage of the earl Douglas. It was a five leagues from Edinburgh, and therein the king set good captains and then rode small journeys till he came to Berwick, the which is at the entry of Sc

`Plus jeune,' says Froissart.




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