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the king of England his cousin, for he had never seen him before. And when these tidings were spread abroad in the realm of France, then dukes, earls and other lords apparelled them in their best manner ; and the king of France wrote his letters to king Charles of Bohemia his cousin and to the king of Navarre, certifying them the day and time when the king of England should be with him, desiring them to be with him at the same day: and so they came thither with great array. Then was it counselled the king of France that he should receive the king of England at the city of Amiens. And there to make provision for his coming there was chambers, halls, hostelries and lodgings made ready and apparelled to receive them all and their company, and also for the duke of Burgoyne, the duke of Bourbon, the duke of Lorraine and sir John of Artois. There was purveyance for a thousand horse, and for six hundred horse that should come with the king of England. The young king of England forgat not the voyage that he had to do into France ; and so he apparelled for him and his company well and sufficiently: and there departed out of England in his company two bishops, beside the bishop of London, and four earls, the lord Henry earl of Derby, his cousin-german, son to sir Thomas earl of Lancaster with the wry neck, the earl of Salisbury, the earl of Warwick and the earl of Hereford, and six barons, the lord Raynold Cobham, the lord Thomas Wake, marshal of England, the lord Percy, the lord Manne' and the lord Mowbray, and more than forty other knights ; so that the king and his company were about a thousand horse: and the king was two days in passing between Dover and Wissant. Then the king and his company rode to Boulogne, and there tarried one day. This was about the mid of August the year of our Lord God a thousand three hundred and twenty-nine. And anon the tidings came to king Philip of France how the king of England was at Boulogne. , Then the king of France sent his constable with great plenty of knights to the king of England, who
1 This name, which the translator writes 'Manny,' perhaps stands for' Mohun.'


as then was at Montreuil by the sea-side,1 and there was great tokens of love and good cheer made on both parties. Then the king of England rode forth with all his rout, and in his company the constable of France ; and he rode so long that they came to the city of Amiens, whereas king Philip; and the king of Bohemia, the king of Mallorca and the king of Navarre were ready apparelled to receive the king of England, with many other dukes, earls and great barons; for there was all the twelve peers of France ready to feast and make cheer to t&e king of England, and to be there peaceably to bear witness of the king of England's homage. There was the king of England nobly received, and thus these kings and other princes tarried at Amiens the space of fifteen days. And in the mean time there were many words and ordinances devised; but as far as I could know, king Edward of England made his homage to the king of France all only by word, and not putting his hands between the king of France hands, nor none other prince nor prelate limited for him : nor the king of England would not proceed any further in doing any more concerning his homage, but rather he was determined to return again into England. And there was read openly the privileges of ancient time granted, [in] the which was declared in what manner the king should do his homage, and how and in what wise he should do service to the king of France. Then the king of France said, `Cousin, we will not deceive you: this that ye have done pleaseth us right well as for this present time, till such time as ye be returned again into your realm, and that ye have seen under the seals of your predecessors how and in what wise ye should do.' And so thus the king of England took his leave and departed from the king of France right amiably, and of all other princes that was there, and returned again, into England, and laboured so long that he came to Windsor, where his queen received him right joyously, and demanded tidings of king Philip her uncle and of her lineage of France. The king shewed her all that he knew, and of the great cheer and honour that he had there, and said, in his mind
1 Montreuil-sun-Mer.




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