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embalmed, and honourably he was interred in the abbey of Dunfermline in the year of our Lord God MCCCXXVII., the seventh day of the month of November.' And when the springing-time began, then sir William Douglas purveyed him of that which appertained for his enterprise and took his ship at the port of Montrose in Scotland, and sailed into Flanders, to Sluys, to hear tidings and to know if there were any nobleman in that country that would go to Jerusalem, to the intent to have more company. And he lay still at Sluys the space of twelve days or he departed, but he would never come a-land, but kept still his ship, and kept always his port and behaviour with great triumph, with trumpets and clarions, as though' he had been king of Scots himself; and in his company there was a knight banneret and seven other knights of the realm of Scotland, and twenty-six young squires and gentlemen to serve him ; and all his vessel was of gold and silver-pots, basins, ewers, dishes, flagons, barrels, cups and all other things; and all such as would come and see him, they were well served with two manner of wines and divers manner of spices, all manner. of people according to their degrees. And when he had thus tarried there the space of twelve days, he heard reported that Alphonso king of Spain made war against a Saracen king of Granade. Then he thought to draw to that part, thinking surely he could not bestow his time more nobly than to war against God's enemies and that enterprise done, then he thought to go forth to Jerusalem and to achieve that he was charged with. And so he departed and took the sea toward Spain, and arrived at the port of Valence the great.2 Then he went straight to the king of Spain, who held his host against the king of Granade Saracen, and they were near together, on the frontiers of his land.
1 This date should be 7th June 1329. Froissart adds that the earl of Moray died almost immediately after, but the corruption of the text made the statement unintelligible to the translator, who therefore omitted it. It is in fact inaccurate. Note that the William Douglas of this story is really James Douglas.
2 Valenza in Aragon, called `Valence le grant' to distinguish it from Valence in Dauphine and from Valencia in Portugal.


And within a while after that this knight sir William Douglas was come to the king of Spain, on a day the king issued out into the field to approach near to his enemies. And the king of Granade issued out in like wise on his part, so that each king might see other with all their banners displayed. Then they arranged their battles each against other. Then sir William Douglas drew out on the one side with all his company, to the intent to skew his prowess the better. And when he saw these battles thus ranged on both parties, and saw that the battle of the king of Spain began somewhat to advance toward their enemies, he thought then verily that theyshould soon assemble together to fight at hand strokes; and then he thought rather to be with the foremost than with the hindermost, and strake his horse with the spurs, and all his company also, and dashed into the battle of the king of Granade, crying, 'Douglas! Douglas !' weening to him the king of Spain and his host had followed, but they did not ; wherefore he was deceived, for the Spanish host stood still. And so this gentle knight was enclosed, and all his company, with the Saracens, whereas he did marvels in arms, but finally he could not endure, so that he and all his company were slain. The which was great damage, that the Spaniards would not rescue them. Also in this season there were certain lords that treated for peace between Eng. land and Scotland. So that at the last there was a marriage made and solemnised between the young king of Scotland and dame Joan of the Tower, sister to king Edward of England, at Berwick, as the English chronicle saith,1 on Mary Maudlin day, the year 'of our Lord MCCCXXVIII., against the assent of many of the nobles of the realm. But queen Isabel the king's mother and the earl Mortimer made that marriage ; at the which, as mine author saith, there was great feast made on both parties.
1 The addition from the `English chronicle' is from the words 'on Mary Maudlin day' to `that marriage.'-Fabyan, p. 439.




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