Page 015

Page 15 (Chronicles of Froissart)



page 14



there was sir John le Belt and sir Henry his brother, sir Godfrey de la Chapelle, sir Hugh d'Ohey, sir John de Libyne, sir Lambert d'Oupey, and sir Gilbert de Herck: and out of Cambresis and Artois there were come certain knights of their own good wills to advance their bodies: so that sir John of Hainault had well in his company five hundred men of arms, well apparelled and richly mounted. And after the feast of Pentecost came thither sir Guilliam de Juliers, who was after duke of Juliers after the decease of his father, and sir Thierry of Heinsberg, who was after earl of Loos, and with them a right fair rout, and all to keep company with the gentle knight sir John of Hainault lord Beaumont.

CHAPTER XVI

The dissension that was between the archers of England and them of Hainault.

THE gentle king of England, the better to feast these strange lords and all their company, held a great court on Trinity Sunday in the Friars,2 whereas he and the queen his mother were lodged, keep ing their house each of them apart. At his feast the king had well five hundred knignts, and fifteen were new made. And the queen had well in her court sixty ladies and damosels,. who were there ready to make feast and cheer to sir John of Hainault and to his company. There might have been seen great nobless [in serving] plenty of all manner of strange victuals. There were ladies and damosels freshly apparelled, ready to have danced if they might have leave. But incontinent after dinner there began great fray between some of the grooms and
1 This is John le Bel, canon of Saint Lambert's in Liege, on whose chronicle this early part of Froissart's history is founded. He was therefore an eye-witness of the events of this campaign. In the account which follows of the affray at York some MSS. have this addition: 'There sir John le Bel, canon of Liege, upon whose chronicles and on whose relation of this and of other events I have founded and ordered this book, was in great peril: for all unarmed he was among them for a long time, and arrows were flying on all sides, and he himself was wounded by them and also divers of his companions, nigh unto death.'
2 ' En la maison des Freres Mineurs.'

pages of the strangers and of the archers of England, who were lodged among them in the said suburbs ; and anon all the archers assembled them together with their bows, and drove the strangers home to their lodging. And the most part of the knights and masters of them were as then in the king's court ; but as soon as they heard tidings of the fray, each of them drew to their own lodging in great haste, such as might enter. And such as could not get in were in great peril, for the archers, who were to the number of three thousand,[ shot fast their arrows, not sparing masters nor varlets. And it was thought and supposed that this fray was begun by some of the friends of the Spencers and of the earl of Arundel's, who were put to death before by the aid and counsel of sir John of Hainault, as ye have heard before, [who] as then peradventure thought to be somewhat revenged and' to set discord in the host. And so the Englishmen, that were hosts to these strangers, shut fast their doors and windows and would not suffer them to enter into their lodgings : howbeit some gat in on the back side and quickly armed them, but they durst not issue out into the street for fear of the arrows. Then the strangers brake out on the back side, and brake down pales aid hedges of gardens, and drew them into a certain plain place and abode their company, till at the last they were a hundred and above of men of arms and as many unharnessed, such as could not get to their lodgings. And when they were assembled together, they hasted them to go and succour their companions, who defended their lodgings in the great street. And as they went forth, they passed by the lodging of the lord d'Enghien, whereas there were great gates both before and behind, open ing into the great street. And the archers of England shot fiercely at the house, and there were many o



Page 15 (Chronicles of Froissart)