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at Bristow, and besieged the town round about as near as they might: and the king and sir Hugh Spencer the younger held them in the castle, and the old sir Hugh Spencer and the earl of Arundel held them in the town. And when the people of the town saw the great power that the queen was of (for almost all England was of her accord), and perceived what peril and danger evidently they were in, they took counsel among themselves and determined that they would yield up the town to the queen, so that their lives and goods might be saved. And so they sent to treat with the queen and her council in this matter ; but the queen nor her council would not agree thereto without she might do with sir Hugh Spencer and with the earl of Arundel what it pleased her. When the people of the town saw they could have no peace otherwise, nor save the town nor their goods nor their lives, in that distress they accorded to the queen and opened the gates, so that the queen and sir John o� Hainault, and all her barons, knights and squires, entered into the town and took their lodgings within, as many as might, and the residue without. Then sir Hugh Spencer and the earl of Arundel were taken and brought before the queen, to do her pleasure with them. Then there was brought to the queen her own children, John her son and her two daughters, the which were found there in the keeping of the said sir Hugh Spencer, whereof the queen had great joy, for she had not seen them long 'before. Then the king might have great sorrow and sir Hugh Spencer the younger, who were fast enclosed in the strong castle, and the most part of all the realm turned to the queen's part and to Edward her eldest son.

CHAPTER XII

How that sir Hugh Spencer the elder and the earl of Arundel were judged to death.

WHEN the queen and her barons and all her company were lodged at their ease, then they besieged the castle as near as they might. Thequeen caused sir Hugh Spencer the elder and the earl of Arundel to be brought forth before Edward her son and all the barons that were there present, and said how that she and her son should take right and law on them according to their deserts. Then sir Hugh Spencer said, `Madam, God be to you a good judge and give you good judgment ,1 and if we cannot have it in this world, I pray God we may have it in another.' Then stept forth sir Thomas Wake, a good knight and marshal of the host, and there openly he recounted their deeds in writing, and then turned him to another ancient knight to the intent that he should bring him on that case fauty,2 and to declare what should be done with such persons, and what judgment they should have for such causes. Then the said knight counselled with other barons and knights, and so reported their opinions, the which was, how they had well deserved death for divers horrible deeds, the which they have commised, for all the trespass rehearsed before to justify to be of truth ;3 wherefore they have deserved for the diversities of their trespasses to have judgment in three divers manners-first, to be drawn, and after to be headed, and then to be hanged on the gibbet. This in likewise as they were judged so it was done and executed before the castle of Bristow in the sight of the king and of sir H ugh Spencer the younger. This judgment was done in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVI., on Saint Denis' day in October. And after this execution the king and the young Spencer, seeing themselves thus besieged in this mischief, and knew no comfort that might come to them, in a morning betimes they two with a small company entered into a little vessel behind the castle, thinking to have fled to the country of Wales. But they were eleven days in the ship, and enforced it to sail as much as they might; but whatsoever they did, the wind was every day so contrary to them by the will of God, that

1 This should be, `God give us a good judge and good judgment'; but Wrard's edition, from which the translation was made, has `vous' for 'nous.'
2 This appears to mean, 'To the intent that he should find him



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