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Sanses de Boussoit, the lord of Vertaing, the lord of Potelle, the lord Villers, the' lord of Hennin, the lord of Sars, the lord of Bousies, the lord of Aubrecicourt, the lord of Estrumel, and sir Wulfart of Ghistelles, and divers other knights and squires, all in great desire to serve their master. And when they were all departed from the haven of Dordrecht, it was a fair fleet as for the quantity, and well ordered, the season was fair and clear and right temperate, and at their departing with the first flood they came before the dikes of Holland; and the next day they drew up their sails and took their way in coasting Zealand ; and their intents were to have, taken land at Dongport ;1 but they could not, for a tempest took them in the sea, that put them so far out of their course that they wist not of two days where they were: of the which God did them great grace, for if they had taken land at the port whereas they had thought, they had been all lost, for they had fallen in the hands of their enemies, who knew well of their coming, and abode them there to have put them all to death. So it was that about the end of two days the tempest ceased, and the mariners perceived land in England and drew to that part right joyously, and there took land on the sands without any right haven or port at Harwich, as the English chronicle saith,2 the 24th day of September, the year of our Lord MCCCXXVI., and so abode on the sands three days with little purveyance of victual, and unshipped their horses and harness, nor they wist not in what part of England they were in, other in the power of their friends or in the power of their enemies. On the fourth day they took forth their way in the adventure of God and of Saint George, as such people as had suffered great disease of cold by night and hunger and great fear, whereof they were not as then clean rid. And so they rode forth by hills and dales on the
1 This name is a false reading in the text which the translator followed, a corruption of the words ` ung port.'
2 The statement from the `English chronicle'that they landed at Harwich on the 24th of September 1326 is due to the translator. The English chronicle to which he refers here and also in chaps. 18, 19, 20, etc., is evidently Fabyan's New Chronicles of England and France, or Concordance of Histories, printed by Pynson in 1516. The reference here is to P- 429.

one side and on the other, till at the last they found villages and a great abbey of black monks, the which is called SaintEdmund, whereas they three days refreshed themselves.

CHAPTER XI

How the queen of England besieged the king her husband in the town of Bristow.

AND then this tiding spread about the realm so much, that at the last it came to the knowledge of the lords by whom the queen was called again into England. And they apparelled them in all haste to come to Edward her son, whom they would have to their sovereign lord. And the first that came and gave them most comfort was Henry earl of Lancaster with the wry neck, called Tort Col, who was brother to Thomas earl of Lancaster, beheaded as ye have heard herebefore, who was a good knight and greatly recommended, as ye shall hear after in this history. This earl Henry came to the queen with great company of men of war, and after him came from one part and other earls, barons. knights and squires, with so much people that they thought them clean out of perils, and always increased their power as they went forward. Then they took counsel among them that they should ride straight to the town of Bristow, whereas the king was, and with him the Spencers. The which was a good town and a strong, and well closed, standing on a good port of the sea, and a strong castle, the sea beating round about it. And therein was the king and sir Hugh Spencer the elder, who was about ninety of age, and sir Hugh Spencer his son, who was chief governour of the king and counselled him in all his evil deeds. Also there was the earl of Arundel, who had wedded the daughter of sir Hugh Spencer, and di



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