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and the earl of Kent and sir Roger Mor-timer, and to put them all in the hands of I the king and of sir Hugh Spencer. Where fore he came on a night and declared all this to the queen, and advised her of the peril that she was in. Then the queen was greatly abashed, and required biro all weeping of his good counsel. Then he said: 'Madam, I counsel you that ye depart and go into the Empire, whereas there be many great lords, who may right well aid you, and specially the earl Guilliam of Hainault and sir John of Hainault his brother. These two are great lords and wise men, true, drad and redoubted of their enemies.' Then the queen caused to be made ready all her purveyance, and paid for everything as secretly as she might, and so she and her son, the earl of Kent and all her company departed from Paris and rode toward Hainault, and so long she rode that she came to Cambresis ; and when she knew she was in the Empire, she was better assured than she was before, and so passed through Cambresis and entered into Ostrevant in Hainault, and lodged at Bugnicourt, in a knight's house who was called sir d'Aubrecicourt, who received her right joyously in the best manner to his power, insomuch that afterward the queen of England and her son had with them into England for ever the knight and his wife and all his children, and advanced them in divers manners. The coming thus of the queen of England and of her son and heir into the country of Hainault was anon well known in the house of the good earl of Hainault, who as then was at Valenciennes; and sir John of Hainault was certified of the time when the queen arrived at the place of sir d'Aubrecicourt, the which sir John was brother to the said earl Guilliam, and as he that was young and lusty, desiring all honour, mounted on his horse and departed with a small company from Valenciennes,. and came the same night to Bugnicourt, and did to the queen all honour and reverence that he could devise. The queen, who was right sorrowful, began to declare (complaining to him right piteously) her dolours ; whereof the said sir John had great pity, so that the water dashed in his eyen, and said, ' Certainly, fair lady, behold me here your own knight, who shall you into your estates in England, by the grace of God and with the help of your friends in that parts : and I and such other as I can desire shall put our lives and goods in adventure for your sake, and shall get men of war sufficient, if God be pleased, without the danger of the king of France your brother.' Then the queen would have kneeled down for great joy that she had, and for the good-will he offered her, but this noble knight took her up quickly in his arms and said : 'By the grace of God the noble queen of England shall not kneel to me ; but, madam, recomfort yourself and all your company, for I shall keep you faithful promise ; and ye shall go see the earl my brother and the countess his wife and all their fair children, who shall receive you with great joy, for so I heard them report they would do.' Then the queen said: 'Sir, I find in you more love and comfort than in all the world, and for this that ye say and affirm me I thank you a thousand times ; and if ye will do this ye have promised in all courtesy and honour, I and my son shall be to you for ever bound, and will put all the realm of England in your abandon; for it is right that it so should be.' And after these words, when they were thus accorded, sir John of Hainault took leave of the queen for that night, and went to Denaing and lay in the abbey; and in the morning after mass he leapt on his horse and came again to the queen, who received him with great joy. By that time she had dined and was ready to mount on her horse to, depart with him ; and so the queen departed from the castle of Bugnicourt, and took leave of the knight and of the lady, and thanked them for their good cheer that they bad made her, and said that she trusted once to see the time that she or her son should well remember their courtesy. Thus departed the queen in the company of the said sir John lo



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